Monthly Archives: January 2013

Almost Christian-Imposter faith

The title of Kendra Creasy Dean’s Almost Christian derives from Acts 26:28 where the KJV has King Agrippa say to Paul, “Almost thou persuadest me to be a Christian.” Church-going teenagers have been surveyed and studied.  They are almost never … Continue reading

Posted in Church, Spirituality | Tagged , , , | Leave a comment

Ray Bradbury would be proud

The other day I referred to an NPR report that  terror-linked rebels had burned old manuscripts in Mali.  The report turns out not to be true. A report on how the news that went around the world’s media was wrong … Continue reading

Posted in Uncategorized | Tagged , | Leave a comment

Almost Christian

I have switched to reading something a little different.  I saw a review of Kendra Creasy Dean’s Almost Christian: What the Faith of Our Teenagers is Telling the American Church.  This is the kind of thing I would have definitely … Continue reading

Posted in Church, Uncategorized | Tagged , | Leave a comment

What would Ray Bradbury Say?

They are burning ancient books in Mali. On Monday, Timbuktu’s Mayor Ousmane Halle said from Mali’s capital Bamako that he had gotten word Islamist fighters had torched the library as well as his office before retreating. I can’t be open-minded … Continue reading

Posted in Uncategorized | Tagged , | Leave a comment

Public Prayer

When I led worship some people noticed that, although I preached almost without notes, I usually read prayers that I had written out beforehand. I found it easier to plan out ahead of time a longer speech than a short … Continue reading

Posted in Spirituality | Tagged , , | Leave a comment

Stephen L. Cook-Why this book is important

As I said in my first post about Stephen L. Cook’s The Social Roots of Biblical Yahwism, I think it is an important work.  I am confused by some of his terminology.  I am not convinced by all of his … Continue reading

Posted in Ancient Israel, Theology | Tagged , | Leave a comment

Ancient Roman toilet habits

In regards to sensationalizing archeology and ancient history, I got a kick out of this from Ann Althouse. We used to explain certain rocks from the Roman era as tokens used in games.  There is a new theory that the … Continue reading

Posted in Uncategorized | Tagged , | Leave a comment

Stephen L. Cook-Shechem and Bethel

In The Social Roots of Biblical Yahwism, Stephen L. Cook presents a speculative, but fascinating, theory that the old city of Shechem still in the eighth century was a sacred site to those who held the Sinai theology.  He believes that … Continue reading

Posted in Ancient Israel, Theology | Tagged , , , , , | Leave a comment

Stephen L. Cook-Hosea

Stephen L. Cook talks about the prophet Hosea as a rural levitical priest.  I think most people think of the priests at the Jerusalem temple when they think of biblical priests.  But people in segmentary agrarian societies typically have a … Continue reading

Posted in Ancient Israel, Spirituality, Theology | Tagged , , , | Leave a comment

Stephen L. Cook-on the coattails of Asaph

There is not a separate chapter in Cook’s The Social Roots of Biblical Yahwism about the Psalms of Asaph, but I refers to them throughout as part of the Sinai tradition. I appreciate that he takes a position much like I … Continue reading

Posted in Ancient Israel, Deuteronomy, Psalms | Tagged , | Leave a comment